September

In september we purchased four old english game bantams, 2 sussex and 2 mixed breed pullets. One of the sussex chicks turned into a rooster. He is no longer with us. John built the moveable tractor for the girls to live in.

The tractor has turned out to be a very good method of fertilizing and weeding the raised beds. We have found that the roughly 3 to 4 weeks is the ideal amount of time for the tractor to remain on each bed . The tractor is light enough to be moved by two people, without too much effort. The hens keep us in an abundance of eggs. They are fed either garden and vegetable scraps, vegetable matter from the local organic shop, or a purchased organic mash.

A bag of the mash costs $30 and will last roughly 3 to 5 months, depending on the season, as I feed it to them more in winter, to encourage their egg laying. We have not purchased eggs from the shop since having the hens.

I started my first compost heap in September. We purchased a light electric mulched which has been invaluable for making use of the pruning’s from the established trees in the yard. I also spent time collecting mulch from friends’ and families’ gardens. To make the compost bin i used old fence posts and star pickets. I still use this method for making compost heaps. Eventually this first compost heap was made into a garden bed, which is still sprouting self seeded potatoes.

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